Departments

Welcome to the Health Services Department

Please see an Important Health Update on Three Illnesses/Viruses
1. Enterovirus D68
2. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease
3. Flu

Click On Tab " 2014 Health Updates"

Our Department Information | 2014 Nursing Assignments

List Director of Nursing
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Kathleen McNulty, RN, MSN,NCSN,AE-C
(781) 477-7202 ext.3342
mcnultyk@lynnschools.org
List Accounts Clerk
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Kathleen Compton
(781) 477-7202 ext.3341
comptonk@lynnschools.org
List Aborn Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Theresa Arsenault, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7320
arsenaultt@lynnschools.org
List Breed Middle School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Elizabeth LeClerc, RN, MSN,
(781) 477-7219
leclerce@lynnschools.org
List Breed Middle School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Jennifer Spina, RN, BSN, NCSN
(781) 477-7219
spinaj@lynnschools.org
List Brickett Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Deb McManus,RN, BSN
(781) 477-7333
mcmanusd@lynnschools.org
List Callahan Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Theresa Breen, RN, AD, EMT-B
(781) 477-7338
breent@lynnschools.org
List Classical High School 10 - 11- 12
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
June Blake, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7196
blakej@lynnschools.org
List Classical High School 9
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Rachael Bradley, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7196
bradleyr@lynnschools.org
List Cobbet Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Beth Murphy, RN, MSN
(781) 477-7341
murphyb@lynnschools.org
List Connery Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Pauline Coulon, RN, BSN, NCSN
(781) 477-7344
coulonp@lynnschools.org
List Cubbies Den
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Jacqueline Murphy, RN, AD
(781) 581-7420
murphyjac@lynnschools.org
List Early Childhood Center-Commercial Street
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Nancy Smith, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7220
smithn@lynnschools.org
List Early Childhood Center-Curwin Circle
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Jennifer Swanson, RN, BSN
(339) 883-0328
swansonj@lynnschools.org
List District Float
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Denise Ferrari, RN, MSN

ferrarid@lynnschools.org
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Kerry Molloy, RN, BSN

molloyk@lynnschools.org
List Drewicz Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Mary Keefe, RN, MSN
(781) 477-7350
keefem@lynnschools.org
List English High School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Dorine Bransfield, RN
(781) 477-7368
bransfieldd@lynnschools.org
List English High School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Val Lozzi, RN, BSN, NCSN
(781) 477-7368
lozziv@lynnschools.org
List Fallon Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Christine Gilligan, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7470
gilliganc@lynnschools.org
List Fecteau-Leary Junior | Senior High School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Barbara Batchelder, RN, BSN
(781) 268-3007
batchelderb@lynnschools.org
List Ford Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Dottie Mah, RN, AD
(781) 477-7375
mahd@lynnschools.org
List Harrington Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Deb Capano, RN
(781) 477-7149
chipmanp@lynnschools.org
List Hood Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Michelle Thivierge, RN, BSN
(781) 7389 or 7390
thiviergem@lynnschools.org
List Ingalls Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Vicki Kennedy, RN, BSN
(781) 599-5570
kennedyv@lynnschools.org
List Ingalls | TEAMS
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Patricia Hourihan, RN, BSN, MSN
(781) 77-7400
hourihanp@@lynnschools.org
List Ingalls | LPN | SPED
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Doris Barrasso, LPN
(781) 77-7400
barrassod@lynnschools.org
List Lincoln-Thomson
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Jennifer Swanson, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7460 | (339) 883-0328
swansonj@lynnschools.org
List Lynn Woods/Pickering Elementary Schools
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Marietta Collins, RN, BSN, MBA
(781) 477-7433
collinsm@lynnschools.org
List LVTI High School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Jacqueline Murphy, RN, AD
(781) 581-7420
murphyjac@lynnschools.org
List LVTI Annex
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Mary Smith, RN
(781) 477-7220
smithm@lynnschools.org
List Marshall Middle School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Renee Domegan, RN, BSN
(781) 477-0664
domeganr@lynnschools.org
List Marshall Middle School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Vonette Rich, RN, BSN
(781) 477-0664
richv@lynnschools.org
List Parent Information Center
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Deborah Tanzer, RN, M. ED
(781) 7220 Ext 3207
tanzerd@lynnschools.org
List Pickering Middle School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Robin Erelli, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7438
erellir@lynnschools.org
List Sewell-Anderson Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail

Ann Liberge, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7444
libergea@lynnschools.org

List Shoemaker Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Mary Ann Frazier, RN
(781) 477-7450
frazierm@lynnschools.org
List Sisson Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Susan Bonavita, RN, BSN
(781) 477-7455
bonavitas@lynnschools.org
List Tracy Elementary School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Pat Chipman, RN, BSN, NCSN
(781) 477-7466
chipmanp@lynnschools.org
List Washington S.T.E.M School
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Angie Reaney, RN, BSN
(339) 883-1414
reaneya@lynnschools.org
List Vision and Hearing | District
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Kathy Olson
(781) 477-7201 X 102
olsonk@lynnschools.org
  Contact
Phone
E-mail
Joanne Connor
(781) 477-7201 X 102
connorj@lynnschools.org


Important Health Update on Three Illnesses/Viruses | September 2014

FLU CLINIC NOTICE:
The City of Lynn will be holding a Flu Clinic at Breed Middle School in the Cafeteria this Thursday, October 16, 2014 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.  The Flu Clinic is open to all individuals Ages 6 months and up.  Please bring your insurance cards with you.  You will not be turned away if you do not have insurance.  This is for Lynn residents only.

1. Enterovirus D68
2. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease
3. Flu

1. Enterovirus D68

Schools in a number of states are seeing an increase in students with a severe respiratory illness caused by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). At this time the state of Massachusetts has confirmed at least one case of the enterovirus.  Of course with all the attention in the media, our school nurses and city health care providers are keeping close watch over our students and their families. 

Click here to download the latest Clinical Advisory that we received from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services, Department of Public Health. 

The advisory contains information, advice for parents and patients, and a link to the CDC website where you will find more information and guidance.

The best advice we have to prevent contracting and spreading the virus is to WASH YOUR HANDS with soap and water for 20 seconds and keep your hands away from your face.  Please encourage your children to do just that.

Click here to download a Enterovirsu D68 Fact Sheet

 
2. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

The second illness is one we have seen in our schools, although there are very few cases.  It is also caused by a virus and is called hand, foot and mouth diseaseHand-foot-and-mouth disease is common in children but can also occur in adults. It can occur at any time of year but is most common in the summer and fall.

Please note: It is not the same as other diseases that have similar names: foot-and-mouth disease (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth disease) or mad cow disease. These diseases almost always occur in animals.

We would like to share the following information about this illness. If your children are in a school where cases of this virus are known, you will also receive this information in a letter that will be sent home.

What is it?

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a common illness of infants and young children, most commonly caused by a virus called coxsackievirus. Symptoms include mild fever, poor appetite, and a sore throat.

One or 2 days after the fever begins, tiny blisters develop in the mouth. A skin rash also develops over 1–2 days with flat or raised red spots, some with blisters. The rash is not itchy and is usually found on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Illness is usually mild and most people get better in 7–10 days.

How do you catch hand, foot, and mouth disease?
It is spread when the virus from stool or saliva gets on hands or objects and then onto other people’s hands and into mouths.

A person is most contagious during the first week of the illness, but they still can have the virus for many weeks, especially in their stool.

People usually get sick 3 to 7 days after being exposed to the virus.

How is hand, foot, and mouth disease diagnosed?
Health care providers can tell if people have hand, foot, and mouth disease by their symptoms. A laboratory test can be done on the throat or stool to know forsure, but since the testing often takes 2–4 weeks to obtain a final answer, these tests are usually not ordered.

How is hand, foot, and mouth disease treated?
There is no specific treatment for hand, foot, and mouth disease, but your health care provider may suggest treatment to relieve some symptoms.

How do you stop the spread of hand, foot, and mouth disease?
Always wash your hands with soap and running water after using the toilet, changing a diaper, helping a child use the toilet, and before touching food or eating.

Also wash your hands after wiping or blowing noses or after touching your nose, throat, or eye secretions.

Babies and children need their hands washed at these times, too.

Encourage your child not to share food, drinks, or utensils at school.

When can your child return to school?
A child with hand, foot, and mouth disease can return to school as soon as he/she feels well enough to attend.

 
3. Flu
Flu season will soon be upon us!  The Lynn Health Department has two upcoming FREE flu clinics for all residents 6 months old and above. Both clinics will be held at Lynn City Hall, City Hall Square, Room 103. Please bring your health insurance card if you have one, however you may still receive a vaccine if you do not have a health card!

FLU CLINICS will be held on:
Saturday, September 27th from 10AM until 2PM
Saturday, October 4th from 10AM until 2PM     

Feel free to bring the entire family! 

The Flu: A Guide For Parents | 2013

2013 | 2014 The Flu: A Guide For Parents Is Available Online
Translate The Flu Season is upon us and unpredictable. Even during mild seasons influenza can cause illness and even death for thousands of people in the United States. It also causes a substantial amount of missed school among students, faculty, and staff. The single best way to prevent influenza is vaccination of everyone six months of age and older. This flu guide will help protect you and your family against this years flu.

Click here to read or download this important information for your family.

Flu information | What is the flu?
Influenza (the flu) is an infection of the nose, throat and lungs caused by influenza viruses that are constantly changing. Flu causes illness, hospital stays and deaths in the United States each year. Flu can be very dangerous for children. Each year about 20,000 children younger than 5 years old are hospitalized from flu complications, like pneumonia.

How serious is the flu? | Flu illness can vary from mild to severe. Flu can be especially dangerous for young children and children of any age who have certain long term health conditions, including asthma (even mild or controlled), neurological conditions, chronic lung disease, heart disease, blood disorders, endocrine disorders (such as diabetes), and weakened immune systems due to disease or medication. Children with these conditions, and those receiving long-term aspirin therapy, can have more severe illness from the flu.

How does the flu spread? | Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with the flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can
land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, a person might get the flu by touching something that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or nose.

What are the symptoms of flu? | Symptoms of flu can include fever, cough, sore
throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, fatigue and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea. Some people with flu will not have a fever.

How long can a sick person spread the flu? | People with the flu may infect others from 1 day before getting sick to 5-7 days after. Children and people with weakened immune systems can shed virus for longer, and might still be contagious past 7 days, especially if they still have symptoms.

Can my child go to school, daycare or camp if he or she is sick? | No. Your child should stay home to rest and to avoid giving the flu to other children or to caregivers.

When can my child go back to school after having the flu? | Keep your child home until at least 24 hours after their fever is gone, without using feverreducing
medications, like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil). A fever is defined as 100.4°F (38°C) or higher.

Protect your child | How can I protect my child against flu?
The first and most important thing to do is to get flu vaccine for your child, yourself, and everyone else in your household every year. Get the vaccine as soon as it is available.
• Vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months and older.
• It’s especially important that young children and children with certain health conditions (see at left) get vaccinated.
• It’s very important for parents, grandparents, teachers and caregivers to get vaccinated.
• Everyone caring for infants under 6 months (who are too young to be vaccinated) should be vaccinated if possible. Vaccinating pregnant women can offer some protection to the baby during pregnancy and after birth

About flu vaccine | What kinds of flu vaccine are there?
There are two kinds of flu vaccine:
• Inactivated (killed) flu vaccine, the “flu shot,” is given by injection with a needle.
• Live, attenuated (weakened) flu vaccine is sprayed into the nostrils.

The kind of vaccine your child will get depends on their age and health. Your child may be eligible to receive either kind of flu vaccine. Every time your child receives vaccine, your healthcare provider will ask questions which will help determine whether the child should receive vaccine that day, and what kind of vaccine your child should get.

Are there any risks from flu vaccine? | Vaccine reactions, if they occur, are usually mild and can include soreness, redness and swelling where the shot is given, or runny nose after getting the nasal spray. Some people have experienced fever, body aches, headache and fatigue. These reactions usually begin soon after the vaccine is given, and last 1-2 days.

A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause more serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of a vaccine causing serious harm is extremely small. Life threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it is usually within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

More detailed information about flu vaccine is available at www.immunize.org/vis. At this site you will find Vaccine Information Statements about inactivated and live influenza vaccines (the shot and the nasal spray) designed to educate and inform in many languages.

Is influenza vaccine effective? | Yes. While no vaccine is 100% effective, influenza vaccine is the best protection against getting the flu. Influenza vaccine tends to be most effective in people who are younger and healthy. It takes about two weeks after vaccination to protect against flu, so vaccination does not protect immediately. Also, flu viruses are always changing, so the vaccine needs to be updated every year, before flu season starts. When the vaccine isn’t a good match with flu viruses that are circulating, it offers less protection.

People who get flu vaccine are much less likely to get the flu than those who don’t get vaccine, and if vaccinated people get sick with the flu their illness is not as severe.

Other steps to take | What else can I do to protect my child?
Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue. Throw the tissue in the trash after use.
• Stay away from people who are sick.
• Wash hands often with soap and water.
• Use an alcohol-based hand rub if soap and water are not available.
• Contact your healthcare provider if your child gets sick, especially if the child is very young (under 5) or has long-term health conditions.
• Seek emergency care if your child has trouble breathing, fast breathing, turns
bluish or gray, has severe or persistent vomiting, has trouble waking up, or doesn’t
interact normally.

Much more information is available at:
www.mass.gov/flu
www.cdc.gov/flu
www.immunize.org
• Or call 617-983-6800 or your local board of health.

PDFDOWNLOAD The 2013 The Flu: A Guide For Parents

Adated from CDC and developed as per legal requirements pursuant to An Act Relative to Annual Immunization Against Influenza for Children, MGL Chapter 111, Section 229, Amended 2012. Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 2013

Other Resources

This page is under construction...

Acrobat (PDF) Software
PDF

Free Adobe Acrobat Software is required to view our PDF files. You can download the free software using the link below.

 


Search | Lynn Public Schools Website
Loading
  Translate | Select A Language
| HOMEPAGE | CONTACT THE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT | WEBSITE MAP |
Copyright - All Rights Reserved 2014